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Manuscript Submission

In order a manuscript to be submitted require:

• the text has not been published so far;

• it is not under consideration for publication anywhere else at this moment;

• its submission to be approved by all co­authors;

• the manuscript must not contain ideas and suggestions directed against human dignity as well as suggestions supported discrimination and racism;

• all forms of plagiarism are inadmissible.

If the above requirements are violated, then the Journal reserves the right to respond and inform the scientific community and the competent institutions.

Permissions

Authors of manuscripts which include figures, tables and/or text that have already been officially published elsewhere are required to obtain permission from the copyright owner to publish these manuscripts. The permission from the copyright owner will be required along with submission of the manuscript. Authors violating this requirement encounter the relevant laws.

Submission

Authors should submit their manuscripts offline. This method allows the Editor to contact the author directly not mechanically (as a robot) every time when need to do it.

This method allows to simplify and at the same time to optimize the process of submission.

We ask the authors who intend to submit their manuscripts to follow instructions for publication in Submission Centre or in case of questions to e­mail directly on the following e­mail addresses: ejnmee@gmail.com

Notes of importance

Every manuscript will be reviewing by blind review method with two reviewers in a period of time between one and two weeks.

After reviewing manuscripts, the authors get a message through e­mail containing one of the following estimates:

A) to unconditionally accept the manuscript;

B) to accept it in the event that its authors improve it in certain ways;

C) to reject it, but encourage revision and invite resubmission;

D) to reject it outright.

Latest Papers

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      Amorphous Phosphate Coatings on Steel Surfaces – preparation and characterization 
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      Prediction of the flash point of ternary ideal mixtures
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      Environmental Engineering: Principles and Practice 
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  • 3-D reconstructions of individual nanoparticles 2nd April 2020
    What do you see in the picture above? Merely a precisely-drawn three-dimensional picture of nanoparticles? Far more than that, nanotechnologists will say, due to a new study published in the journal Science. Whether a material catalyzes chemical reactions or impedes any molecular response is all about how its atoms are arranged. The ultimate goal of […]
  • Graphene-based actuator swarm enables programmable deformation 1st April 2020
    Actuators that can convert various environmental stimuli to mechanical work have revealed great potential for developing smart devices such as soft robots, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and automatic lab-on-a-chip systems. Generally, bilayer structures are widely used for design and fabrication of stimuli responsive actuators. In the past decade, to pursue fast and large-scale deformation, great efforts […]
  • AI finds 2-D materials in the blink of an eye 1st April 2020
    Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, a part of The University of Tokyo, demonstrated a novel artificial intelligence system that can find and label 2-D materials in microscope images in the blink of an eye. This work can help shorten the time required for 2-D material-based electronics to be ready for consumer devices.
  • Phage capsid against influenza: Perfectly fitting inhibitor prevents viral infection 31st March 2020
    A new approach brings the hope of new therapeutic options for suppressing seasonal influenza and avian flu. On the basis of an empty and therefore non-infectious shell of a phage virus, researchers from Berlin have developed a chemically modified phage capsid that stifles influenza viruses.
  • Mystery solved: The origin of the colors in the first color photographs 31st March 2020
    A palette of colors on a silver plate: That is what the world's first color photograph looks like. It was taken by French physicist Edmond Becquerel in 1848. His process was empirical, never explained, and quickly abandoned. Now, a team at the Centre de recherche sur la conservation (CNRS/Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle/Ministère de la Culture), […]
  • Heart attack on a chip: Scientists model conditions of ischemia on a microfluidic device 30th March 2020
    Researchers led by biomedical engineers at Tufts University invented a microfluidic chip containing cardiac cells that is capable of mimicking hypoxic conditions following a heart attack—specifically when an artery is blocked in the heart and then unblocked after treatment. The chip contains multiplexed arrays of electronic sensors placed outside and inside the cells that can […]
  • Double-walled nanotubes have electro-optical advantages 27th March 2020
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    Making your own ceramics can be a way to express your creativity, but some techniques and materials used in the process could spell bad news for your health and the environment. If not prepared properly, some glazed ceramics can leach potentially harmful heavy metals. Scientists now report progress toward a new type of glaze that […]
  • 3-D printed sensors could make breath tests for diabetes possible 27th March 2020
    The production of highly sensitive sensors is a complex process: It requires many steps and the almost dust-free environment of special cleanrooms. A research team from Materials Science at Kiel University (CAU) and from Biomedical Engineering at the Technical University of Moldova has now developed a procedure to produce extremely sensitive and energy-efficient sensors using […]
  • Low-cost graphene-iron filters that selectively separate gaseous mixtures 27th March 2020
    UNSW researchers have shown how a new class of low-cost graphene-based membranes—a type of filter used in industry sectors that generate enormous mixed waste gases, such as solid plastic waste, biowaste or wastewater—can be selectively tuned to separate different gases from gaseous mixtures.