Plagiarism

Plagiarism

 |Authors|

About Ethic principles and Plagiarism we would like to quote Bela Gipp definition of the academic plagiarism:

The use of ideas, concepts, words, or structures
without appropriately acknowledging the source
to benefit in a setting where originality is expected.

Following Teddi Fishman (Clemson University, USA ) (Fishman, Teddi (Sep 28–30, 2009). “We know it when we see it is not good enough: toward a standard definition of plagiarism that transcends theft, fraud, and copyright“. Proceedings of the 4th Asia-Pacific Conference on Educational Integrity. p.5) we quote and at the same time adopt the next five inadmissible characteristics of the  plagiarism. The plagiarism occurs when someone:

  • Uses words, ideas, or work products;
  • Attributable to another identifiable person or source;
  • Without attributing the work to the source from which it has been obtained;
  • In a situation in which there is a legitimate expectation of original authorship;
  • In order to obtain some benefit, credit, or gain which need not be monetary.

Here we quote some known supplementary definitions:

  • Yale views plagiarism as the “Use of another’s work, words, or ideas without attribution“, which includes “Using a source’s language without quoting, using information from a source without attribution, and paraphrasing a source in a form that stays too close to the original.” (What is Plagiarism”. Yale College. 2012-07-27.)
  • Princeton perceives plagiarism as the “deliberate” use of “Someone else’s language, ideas, or other original (not common-knowledge) material without acknowledging its source.” (“Defining and Avoiding Plagiarism: The WPA Statement on Best Practices”. Princeton University. 2012-07-27)

Self-plagiarism

Self-plagiarism, also known as “recycling fraud” (Dellavalle, Robert P.; Banks, Marcus A.; Ellis, Jeffrey I. (September 2007). Frequently asked questions regarding self-plagiarism: How to avoid recycling fraud”Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 57 (3): 527. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2007.05.018 occurs when an author reuses whole or portions of his own published and copyrighted work in any publication, but without being cited the source.

We declare that manuscripts containing at least one of the above-stated inadmissible characteristics concerning plagiarism and self-plagiarism would not be considered for publication. Then the following sanctions will be applied:

  • We will inform our colleagues and partners for proved plagiarism or self-plagiarism.
  • Prohibition against all of the authors for minimum of one year.

External links:

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